Universal EducationEvery child deserves a right to education.

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Table of contents:
  1. History of the issue
  2. Causes of the issue
  3. Who it effects
  4. Organizations that help





History of the Issue:
In 1948, the right to education was confirmed in the Unniversal Declaration of Rights. Article 26 states:
  • (1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.
  • (2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.
  • (3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children. [1]

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Causes of the Issue:
Underdeveloped countries don't have enough money to build schools sufficient enough for childrens' education. The few schools there are in Africa and India require the families to pay tuition for teachers and books. Families are not able to afford to pay the tuition so they usually do not put their children in school. Many of the children's parents in Sub-Saharan Africa make their children stay home to labor around the house. Many mothers force their daughters to stay home and help out around the house so they are unable to attend school. If government enforced their peoples' right to education, they could make all schools free of tuition and make sure every child gets an education. [2] One in six children of secondary school age attend primary school because they started school too late or had to repeat grades. [3]

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Who It Effects:
The region that has the biggests amounts of children out of school is Sub-Saharan Africa. 46 million African children have never been in a classroom.
NAIROBI, Kenya — School was the last thing on Pascal Mwanchoka's mind when he and his younger brother boarded a bus that would take them hundreds of miles away from their mother and her alcohol-fueled rages.
Just 13 years old, Pascal figured the boys' schooldays were over for good.
"My mother wasn't feeding us, she wasn't taking us to school," said Pascal, who came here from the coastal city of Mombasa looking for work but ended up living in the gutters of Nairobi. "She was a drunk."
Less than a year later, Pascal and 10-year-old Lenjo are off the streets and back in class, attending a free program in Nairobi for children too poor even to afford a meal of maize and beans. They are among millions of children who struggle against vast obstacles for the luxury of going to school on the poorest continent in the world.
Many schools in Kenya ave abolished school tuition fees so that children can get an education. [4]

Children all over the world are effected by the issue of education. Without a proper education, children can't reach their dreams and aren't fully successful. Having an education changes your future and every child deserves to go to school. 60,000 students in Kenya that were admitted to secondary school couldn't go because of costs of transportation, field trips, teacher conferences and building swimming pools. [4]
In India, there are over 200 million illeterate women. Three out of five girls atend school compare to three out of four boys that attend school.
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Organizations That Help:
All of these organizations work hard to make sure human's are granted all of their rights.

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Citations
[1] “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” United Nations. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr>
[2] Burke, Kathleen and Beegle, Kathleen. “Why Children Aren’t Attending School: The Case of Northwestern Tanzania.” Oxford Journals. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://jae.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/13/2/333>
[3] “Progress For Children. A World Fit For Children Statistical Review.” unicef. Dec 2007. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://www.childinfo.org/files/progress_for_children_2007.pdf>
[4] Kennedy, Elizabeth A. “Africa’s children struggle for education.” 7 21 2007 USA today, Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://www.usatoday.com/news/educatio/2007-07-21-africaschild_N.htm >

Bibliography


Burke, Kathleen and Beegle, Kathleen. “Why Children Aren’t Attending School: The Case of Northwestern Tanzania.” Oxford Journals. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://jae.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/13/2/333>

Kennedy, Elizabeth A. “Africa’s children struggle for education.” 7 21 2007 USA today, Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://www.usatoday.com/news/educatio/2007-07-21-africaschild_N.htm>

Velkoff, Victoria A. “Women of the World: Women’s Education in India.” International Programs Center. Oct 1998. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://www.census.gov/ipc/prod/wid-9801.pdf>

“Progress For Children. A World Fit For Children Statistical Review.” unicef. Dec 2007. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://www.childinfo.org/files/progress_for_children_2007.pdf>

“Slovak Education System Fails Romani Children.” Amnesty International. 14 Nov 2007. Web.13 Dec 2009. <
http://www.amnesty.org/en/news-and-updates/report/slovak-education-system-fails-romani-children-20071114>

“Statistics by Area: Education.” Childinfo. unicef. Nov 2009. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://www.childinfo.org/education.html>

“Supporting Education in Tanzania.” Worldbank. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/AFRICAEXT/TANZANIAEXTN/0,,contentMDK:21024033~menuPK:287367~pagePK:1497618~piPK:217854~theSitePK:258799,00.html>

“The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” United Nations. Web. 13 Dec 2009. <
http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr>